Logic Games–CANNOT be true

    • July 26, 2016 at 10:08 am #2306
      cecily
      Participant

      Hi Mike (and others)!

      I’m studying for a retake (first test was 164) and the LSAT Trainer, which I didn’t use before, has been super helpful this time around, and this website is great, so thank you!

      I’m struggling with the “CANNOT be true” LG questions at the moment. I’m working through the book and doing drills and stuff, and I had used the PowerScore books the first time around so I feel like I had a decent foundation, but it’s definitely not as strong as I thought it was, because games are taking me longer than I think they should be. What is the best way to go about the “cannot be true” questions? Is that one of those ones where you have to actually test out each answer to see if they work? It’s taking me so long to do questions like that that I feel like I must be doing something wrong.

    • July 26, 2016 at 10:15 am #2307
      LSAT Dan
      Participant

      It depends on the question. Sometimes, a simple combination of rules will tell you that an answer is right on is type of question. For instance, take a sequencing game where one rule says that A and B are consecutive (in either order), and another rule tells you that C comes after A. Combining those rules, we can see that C comes after B, also, so “C is second” would be a correct answer on a “cannot be true” (typically abbreviated MBF (Must Be False)) question, and you wouldn’t have to test any answers.

      Other times, it’s easier to start by looking at past layouts to eliminate wrong answers (anything that could be true in a valid layout is a wrong answer), and testing remaining answer choices.

      If you posted a question or two (just the test number and question, not typing it all in) of this type that gave you trouble, I could give you a more specific, helpful response.

      -DFO

    • August 2, 2016 at 6:46 am #2355
      cecily
      Participant

      Sure–so one of the ones I was thinking of was Game 2 on PT 31, the used/new CDs game. I’m looking at the explanation in the Trainer for number 10, but I’m still confused. Is the process that you just have to test them all out and eliminate all of them one by one, unless there’s one that just stands out? Thank you!

    • August 4, 2016 at 5:28 pm #2364
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Don’t know if this could help you on this particular game Cecily, but i do my acceptability questions first, then hypotheticals, then must/cannot/could true questions . Generally, I find that you can eliminate 1 or 2 questions of must be/cannot true questions. On those that remain I just worked them out. On others that seem to be harder to figure out, I find that it’s prob cause I missed a major inference. Interested to hear what Dan has to say, but from what I’ve seen on all the Cannot/MUST BE TRUE questions that I’ve reviewed, (which is a lot) they usually are not questions that take too much to figure out. It’s just that time makes it hard if you don’t know right off the bat.

      I forgot the most obvious thing lol, you do it in this order so you can see more of your prior work to help on questions like cannot be true/must be false

    • August 5, 2016 at 7:24 am #2366
      cecily
      Participant

      Ah gotcha. That is helpful, and kind of what I was assuming, but wasn’t sure if I was just going about it totally the wrong way. Thank you!

    • August 6, 2016 at 7:48 pm #2372
      LSAT Dan
      Participant

      L.Towns is absolutely right, for my money – First, with respect to this particular question, since it’s not an “if question,” I’d do it last. Notice that EVERY other question in the section is an acceptability question or an if question. Those questions give you a foot in the door, with the extra information they give you, and that extra information helps you generate valid layouts quickly. Next, be sure you refer to those layouts. For instance, on this question, anything that “could be true” is a wrong answer, so if you got the acceptability question right, you don’t have to waste any time on (A) – you already know that it’s fine to not have opera or rap on sale.

      Additionally, this question will reward a little bit of “meta-thinking” about the game. New Opera is never on sale, and there are no rules restricting Used Opera. Therefore, there isn’t a problem with not having opera on sale, and it’s unlikely that (A), (B), or (C) is correct; if you focus on (D) and (E), and start your testing there, you’re going to find the answer a lot more quickly.

    • August 8, 2016 at 7:32 am #2373
      cecily
      Participant

      Okay, that makes a lot of sense. For some reason I had this idea in my head that you shouldn’t jump around on the questions, but it sounds like that makes it way easier. Thanks!

    • August 8, 2016 at 9:56 am #2374
      LSAT Dan
      Participant

      What you’ll find is that if you wait on answering a question like #10, often it’s completely answered by the time you get back to it. You know that the wrong answers all “Could be True.” It’s not unusual at all that after doing all the “if questions,” you find that when you check your past layouts, you have “Could be True” examples for four of the answer choices – The question is over before it starts!

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      pimete
      Participant

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