Identifying Flaws in Logical Reasoning Arguments

    • August 17, 2017 at 6:27 pm #3275
      futuredoc3094
      Participant

      Hello there! I purchased and completed The LSAT Trainer book and I am still having difficulty in identifying the flaws and what is wrong with the argument in the logical reasoning section. This, I believe, is the main reason why I am not doing well in this section. Any advice on how I can improve is greatly appreciated, thank you so much!!

    • August 17, 2017 at 11:15 pm #3277
      LSAT Dan
      Participant

      One of the most important things is just a solid familiarity with the heavily tested flaws that show up again and again. For instance:

      *Drawing a cause/effect conclusion from premises that only give you correlation.
      *Mixing up a necessary and a sufficient condition.
      *Part to whole and Whole to part fallacies.
      *Assumption-based flaws.
      *Conclusions based on biased samples.
      Etc.

      But more generally, the questions you’re always asking yourself is, “Even if all of these premises are true, why might the conclusion be false?” Very often, that involves a mismatch between the premises and the conclusion, and if you can identify that mismatch, you’ll well on your way to spotting the flaw.

      What do I mean by mismatches?

      *Term Shift: The premises are about *sports*, but the conclusion is about *hobbies*. Or the premises are about *cars*, but the conclusion is about *vehicles.*
      *Degree of strength: The conclusion tells you that something might be true, but the conclusion tells you that it’s probably true.
      *Quantifier: The conclusion tells you that something is true of *some* people, but the conclusion tells you it’s true of *most* people.

      etc.

      Hope this helps.

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